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IDC survey shows Turkish government's focus on IT security

Turkish public-sector organizations are adopting IT security solutions in response to the growing threat of cybercrime, an increasingly complex network environment, and the need to comply with legislated security regulations.

This was revealed in a survey conducted by market research and advisory company IDC among Turkish government IT decision-makers to examine IT security spending patterns, drivers, and challenges.

According to the survey, over a quarter of Turkish government IT decision makers allocate 10 percent or more of their total IT budgets to IT security hardware, software, and services. One in five said they spend between 8 percent and 10 percent of their budgets, and the remainder spends less than 8 percent.

These were among the findings of a survey conducted by market research and advisory company IDC among Turkish government IT executives to examine IT security spending patterns, drivers, and challenges.

"As public-sector information systems are persistently targeted by pervasive and aggressive threats, government entities in Turkey are increasingly acknowledging that effective IT security is an essential operational requirement," said Senior Research Analyst Mukesh Chulani of IDC Government Insights IDC Turkey. "In other words, entities no longer consider IT security a cost; they now regard it as an investment."

Several high-profile security breaches made headlines in the Turkish press not too long ago. For instance, in July 2011, hacker group Anonymous claimed to have stolen data from more than 100 websites and defaced 74 government sites in Turkey.

The group indicated the action was part of a campaign by hackers called Anti Security (AntiSec) to steal and leak classified government information in order to expose security flaws. In November 2011, another widely discussed incident was the hacking of the Turkish Ministry of Finance's Web site.

"These incidents only highlight the fact that adequate data loss prevention security policies, technologies, and enforcement are required amid an expanding threat ecosystem," noted Chulani.

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